Accessibility View Close toolbar

Myopia (Nearsightedness)

man with glasses driving

Myopia, commonly called nearsightedness, is a refractive error of the eye, meaning that the shape of the eye or its cornea improperly bends light as it enters the eye. This hinders your ability to focus. Myopia is the most common refractive error of the eyes, and is caused by several factors including eye strain, overuse, and genetic predisposition.

Myopia Symptoms

Nearsighted eyes are longer than normal. When light enters a nearsighted eye, it focuses to a point in front of the retina, where photoreceptors are located. As a result, nearsighted individuals are able to see nearby objects clearly, but have difficulty focusing on distant objects. In addition to having difficulty seeing distant objects such as road signs, a television screen, or a chalkboard, myopia can also cause eye strain, squinting, and headaches. Nearsighted individuals might also experience a sense of fatigue during athletic activities or while driving.

Inherited myopia develops during childhood, and can progressively worsen as the eyes grow until individuals reach about the age of 20. After the eyes have developed fully, myopia can continue to progress due to eye fatigue and eye strain from activities which require the eyes to be focused on nearby objects like reading and computer work. Individuals without inherited myopia can develop nearsightedness from overuse as well.

Myopia Diagnosis

Myopia is usually diagnosed after the patient notices frequent headaches or difficulty seeing distant objects. After a comprehensive eye exam, an eye care professional will provide a myopia diagnosis. The severity of myopia has three classifications which depend on the strength of the prescription determined by an eye care professional: mild, moderate, and high.

Myopia Treatments

Several treatment options exist for individuals with myopia. These include contact lenses, glasses, and refractive surgery. Glasses and contact lenses correct the refractive error in eyes by bending light before it enters the eye, allowing it to focus on the retina. Refractive surgery, like LASIK surgery, physically reshapes the eye to correct the refractive error, eliminating or reducing the need for corrective lenses.

In addition to these treatments, which are intended to correct nearsighted vision, there are also various therapies available to hinder or slow the progression of myopia in childhood. These treatments include multifocal corrective lenses, atropine eye drops, and orthokeratology. The course of treatment which an eye care professional recommends for each patient depends on the severity of the myopia.

Location

Find us on the map

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

7:00 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am - 6:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am - 6:00 pm

Thursday:

7:00 am - 5:00 pm

Friday:

Closed

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • "I love this place! Our favorite place on the week of Thanksgiving every year to get our family of SEVEN get their eye exams!"
    Jesse M.
  • "My son continues to receive the best care imaginable at Family EyeCare Associates. I would drive hours if that's what it required to see Dr. Hartman, Dr. Garlick, and their wonderful staff. I have truly never seen such compassion. They care about the person as a whole, not just the body part they're treating. Anyone in the healthcare field would do well to adopt even a small amount of the attitude that these people have. I wouldn't consider going anywhere else."
    Robyn Danielle J.
  • "No wonder this business name starts w/word FAMILY! The whole staff treated me like I was part of their family on my first visit here!
    Couldn't have asked for a better experience!"
    Sharon Sheldrew B.